Eat like a champion

healthy plate

So I’ve already gone through my DNA results for training performance therefore its time to go through the nutrition side of things. This is split into macronutrient advice (carbs/fats & protein) and micronutrient advice (vitamins/minerals). Ever wondered why one type of diet works for some people but not others and why there is no one size fits all diet? Well genetic fit to the diet is probably the main reason, a calorie is not just a calorie!

Some people are very sensitive to eating carbohydrates leading to large swings in blood glucose. This gives you a quick high in energy when consuming these foods but also a crash in energy a few hours later. I have never really experienced this and not surprisingly my DNA results showed a low sensitivity to carbohydrates and also saturated fat. This makes me one of those lucky people who can (as long as they exercise) get away with a lot of naughty food.

I do however have a higher than average risk of developing coeliac disease so as much as I may seem to be able to tolerate rubbish food based on my waistline it is sensible for me to eat healthy as I won’t notice the heart disease and coeliac disease creeping on until its well established. I mention heart disease as I also have a higher than average sensitivity to salt intake and I do not gain the benefits of raised HDL cholesterol from moderate alcohol consumption.

So what about the smaller nutrients and supplementation? My micronutrient profile shows a raised need for omega 3 fats, vitamins B6, B9 (folate*), B12 & D. Also I have a greater need for antioxidants due to my moderately reduced capacity to reduce free radical damage on a standard diet. Overall my detoxification ability is fast so standard dietary guidelines for vegetable intake should suffice.

It is important to note that if you have raised needs for any of these areas then standard dietary guidelines will not lead to a healthy enough diet for reducing your risk of conditions such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and diet related cancers. The overall point of this sort of DNA testing is not to scare you and it will not tell you your risk of getting a particular disease. It will tell you how well your body deals with various nutrients from food and therefore what sort of diet is best for you.

As for supplements most people should be able to obtain the majority of their needs from food although if you are going to achieve this it is important to buy high quality produce not just the cheap stuff from Tesco etc. Yes that stuff is still technically the same food but cheap, low standard production results in less nutrients than you would expect under higher quality farming methods.

 

If you are interested in getting your DNA tested you can check the DNAfit website for further details. In the next week or so I will be offering this service from this website so I can give you a small discount on the DNAfit prices which will include a personal consultation to explain your results and what you can do with them. We also have expert personal trainers on site if you wish to follow your training advice under our supervision.

*Folate and folic acid are 2 different forms of vitamin B9. Within the body folic acid will after a complicated series of chemical reactions be turned into folate which is then used to reduce homocysteine (a marker of heart disease) levels. The conversion of folic acid to folate can slow the whole process down so personally I would recommend either consuming plenty of dark green leafy veg (and other foods that contains folate) or supplementing with folate rather than folic acid.