DNA update

DNAWell I did promise I’d have the results of my DNA test up by now but unfortunately there has been a delay due to a problem with my sample apparently….not that kind of sample before you make jokes about my swimming ability! New test kit should arrive this week so still hoping to have some results on here in 2-3 weeks time.

I thought I’d just tease you with some examples of what DNA testing can tell you in the meantime. There are 2 main areas the DNAfit team assess; nutrition and training related gene variations called single nucleotide polymorphisms pronounced “snips” for short (SNP’s). There are at least 3 large, quality studies backing up the recommendations for each of these genes and their effects unlike some of the less scrupulous companies out there.

So I will go through an example of each with you, starting with nutrition. Should you have a low carb diet or not? Well many popular fad diets recommend that these days with some evidence to support in a certain percentage of the population but not others. Transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) is a transcription factor that affects several genes involved with the control of blood sugar levels. An individual may have 2 copies of the “C” allele, 2 copies of the “T” allele or on of each meaning they are “CT”.

The significance of this is individuals with 2 copies of the T allele (TT) generally respond poorly to a low carb/high fat diet. In weight loss studies individuals with the TT allele show the greatest difficulty in losing weight and are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes especially with a poor diet. The good news is matching these individuals to a diet and exercise regime appropriate for their individual genotype (including other genes not just TCF7L2) does lead to significant weight loss (if overweight) and improved blood sugar control.

Example 2 is taken from the training advice side. Alpha-actinin 3 (ACTN3) is a gene associated with fast twitch muscle fibres. The “R” allele is associated with better performance in power and strength based sports. There are several other genes involved in sporting performance but if you don’t have the RR genotype then you are less likely to be elite in power based sports.

The good news about this gene though is that depending on your genotype (RR/RX or XX) and regardless of your training goal we can predict which type of training will give you the most athletic improvement. So even if your goal is to do a triathlon or marathon your training results may actually be better with an increased amount of power based training compared to traditional “textbook” endurance training. Vice versa with speed/power based athletes, some of you depending on your genotype may benefit more from increased endurance training rather than lots of short duration/high intensity/long rest interval stuff.

Yes I know this goes against conventional training wisdom but no training routine or diet works for anywhere near 100% of people. Studies are even starting to appear that show improved sporting performance in endurance or power based training groups when they were matched to a training protocol based on their genetic analysis rather than what is traditionally thought to be the best type of training for that particular goal.

That’s your teaser for now, my DNA results to follow in another blog in the next few weeks, any questions pop them on Facebook or twitter unless you want to keep the private then email: exsicc@gmail.com